Healthy Living Lesson Project

Healthy Living Lesson Project (Student Handout)

Healthy Living Lesson Project

For this project, you will be teaching others how to practice healthy living. You will be expected to plan a short (15 minute) lesson and teach your lesson to a group of students (either your peers or younger students).

Your lesson must include:

  1. A brief explanation of the different areas of health with a focus on the area(s) of health which your activity helps to sustain.
  2. An explanation of how your activity helps sustain the area(s) of health you mentioned.
  3. A short and engaging activity that helps to sustain a healthy lifestyle.

You will be assigned a partner. You will plan and teach your lesson together. Use the lesson plan template on the back of your project handout.

You and your partner will be grouped with another pair. Each pair will be responsible for videotaping and peer-assessing the other pair. You will also be assessed on the effort you put into videotaping and assessing the other pair’s lesson.

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Big Idea: There are things you can do to sustain your own health in all of the different dimensions.

Previously in the Health Education section of the Sustainability Unit we have:

  • Discovered the different dimensions of health/well being.
  • Discovered some of the determinants of our health/well being.
  • Defined what it means to sustain our own health.
  • Examined ways in which we are already sustaining our own health in the different dimensions of health/well being.
  • Practiced some different ways to sustain our health with specific dimensions of health in mind: Laughter Exercise, Outdoor Walk and Creating Resumes. (The Healthy Living Lesson Project is related to this portion of the class. These activities are examples of things that you could do for your projects.)
  • Examined our own health/wellness dimensions separately and as a whole through the use of a questionnaire and wellness wheel.

After this lesson in the Health Education section of the Sustainability Unit we will be:

  • Working to complete the projects. (We will work on these projects in class on Monday, December 9th and Wednesday, December 11th.)
  • Presenting the projects. (We will present these projects sometime during the week of December 16th – December 20th)
  • Assessing the projects (self, peer, and teacher assessment).

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Before we begin working on our projects:

  1. What are you expected to do to complete this project?
  2. What are some examples of lessons you could do to teach others how to sustain their health? – Look at the examples we came up with at the beginning of the unit.
  3. How much class time do we have to work on this project?
  4. Do you have any suggestions for the design of this project?
  5. At the end of the class today, you will submit an exit slip.

While working on our projects:

  1. Think about and discuss what each partner’s role will be during the completion of the project.
  2. Think of an engaging activity to teach others.
  3. Think about what you will need to do this activity (materials).
  4. Think about what you will do in the following 2 classes to complete the project

Exit Slip: What have you done/decided for your project today?

Sustainability Review (Humanities)

Big Ideas:

  1. The Canadian mixed market economy is based on consumerism.
  2. Consumerism is not a sustainable system.
  3. Our personal consumer choices affect us, others, and the environment.
  4. We are all responsible for taking care of the environment.
  5. As Canadians, we have a special responsibility to use, share, and protect our resources.

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Sustainability (End of Unit Review) – Google Presentation

*********Sustainability (Humanities): End of Unit Review – THE TEST!!!!!! This is the test you will be writing. The test should not be a surprise when you sit down to write it.

The Canadian mixed market economy is based on consumerism.

Canadian Mixed Market Economy (Notes)

Canadian Mixed Market Economy (Jeopardy)

Canadian Mixed Market Economy (Review)

Capitalism (Old-school Explanation)

The Story of Stuff

Consumerism is not a sustainable system.

Consumerism! The Musical

Consumerism Facts

The Lorax

Garbology!

Our personal consumer choices affect us, others, and the environment.

Why Buy?

Tricky Business (Jean Companies)

Our Ecological Footprints

Walmart, Here We Come!

Fair Trade

Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle

Buy Local

What does it mean to be rich?

We are all responsible for taking care of the environment.
As Canadians, we have a special responsibility to use, share, and protect our resources.

Canadian Tar Sands

Canada Faces Battle Between Economy and Environment

Environment Canada

Story of Change

Environment Canada

What is Environment Canada? (PREZI): http://prezi.com/c2z7t5s86jc4/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy&rc=ex0share

The History of Environment Canada

Environment Canada was created on June 11, 1971.

The Department began operation with five services:

  • Atmospheric Environment Service
  • Environmental Protection Service
  • Fisheries Service
  • Land, Forest and Wildlife Service
  • Water Management Service

The architects of the early Department of Environment envisioned an organization that would act as ecosystem manager.

The 1970s saw improvements to the Atmospheric Environment Service’s Weather Service, with bilingual forecasts initiated in Ontario, Quebec, and the Atlantic provinces, and with wind chill forecasts in Saskatchewan. In addition to this, the Weatheradio system was established, and the Canadian Climate Centre was created.

In 1979, organizational changes led to the Fisheries Service leaving the Department of Environment to form the Department of Fisheries and Oceans.

In the 1980s, Canada hosted the first International Conference on Acid Rain, and the Department of Environment launched the first of what would be a series of ecosystem initiatives with the Great Lakes Action Plan.  The launch of the Action Plan was the beginning of the Great Lakes clean-up and of our ecosystem approach, which is still the foundation of our work today.

Continuing to Evolve

As a department, we continue to evolve in response to the needs of our clients and partners. From our initial mandate in 1970 to protect the biosphere, we moved to an integrated ecosystem approach in the 1980s and included the concept of sustainable development in Canada’s Green Plan in the 1990s.

Today, Environment Canada continues to balance the need to protect the environment while growing the economy with regulatory frameworks to address air emissions, greenhouse gases, wastewater, and chemicals. Integrating environmental considerations into decision-making processes for projects as varied as mining and construction to the 2010 Olympic Winter Games is a natural demonstration of commitment to a foundation of sustainable development.

Environment Canada Fields of Research: